January 25, 2019 – “I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood,” said Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and in realization of this dream, churches and faith communities representing a panorama of African and European heritage came together this year in Nashville for a worship service in observance of Martin Luther King Day.

This was the annual MLK Day celebration service taking place at the Church of Scientology on Sunday, Jan 20, 2019, and Rev. Julie Brinker feels this is a historic way to help make Dr. King’s dream a reality. “With so many congregations coming together to worship as one, choirs joining each other in song, people of different denominations sitting side by side, and each faith leader participating, it’s a beautiful way to honor Dr. King’s legacy.”

This is the second year the Church of Scientology has hosted the service.

Participating faith leaders included Rev. J.J. Green of Mount Lebanon Missionary Baptist Church, Rev. Enoch Fuzz of Corinthian Baptist Church, Carol Mansour with the Baha’is of Middle Tennessee, Bishop Minnie Mitchell with New Life Through Christ Ministries, Rev. Keith Horn of Church of Scientology Nashville, and more.

“Dr. King stood for diversity and a unity among all people. We are celebrating that in the best way possible –actually coming together in one place and celebrating our differences and similarities,” says Rev. Brinker of the Church of Scientology.

From its beginnings, the Church of Scientology has recognized that freedom of religion is a fundamental human right. In a world where conflicts are often traceable to intolerance of others’ religious beliefs and practices, the Church has, for more than fifty years, made the preservation of religious liberty an overriding concern.

Religious freedom is a right enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The Church of Scientology and Scientologists support United for Human Rights, the world’s largest nongovernmental human rights education campaign, active in 192 countries and partnering with 1,500 groups and organizations. The initiative is inspired by Mr. Hubbard’s conviction that “It is vital that all thinking men urge upon their governments sweeping reforms in the field of human rights.”

For more information about the Church of Scientology or its programs, visit the Scientology website.

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Patty
Preety holds a Master’s in Journalism from Ryerson University and writes professionally in a broad variety of genres. She has worked as a senior manager in public relations and communications for major telecommunication companies and is the former Deputy Director of Media Relations with the Modern Coalition.