Kenneth Rebong, MD, doctor in California

Kenneth Rebong, MD, doctor in California

Pediatrician Dr Kenneth Rebong, San Jose California

Pediatrician Dr Kenneth Rebong, San Jose, California

Dr Kenneth Rebong, medical doctor, California

Dr Kenneth Rebong, medical doctor, California

Kenneth Rebong, MD, doctor in California

Kenneth Rebong, MD, doctor in California

Dr Kenneth Rebong, medical doctor, California

Dr Kenneth Rebong, medical doctor, California

Croup is a disease that involves swelling of the interior of the trachea, making breathing difficult. Dr. Kenneth P. Rebong explains in his new article.

Kenneth Pomar Rebong, MD (N/A:N/A)

This respiratory infection is of two types, viral croup, and bacterial croup. As the names suggest, the infection is caused either by a bacterium or by viruses.”

— Dr. Kenneth P Rebong, pediatrician

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA, UNITED STATES, July 1, 2019 /EINPresswire.com/ — Croup, also known as laryngotracheobronchitis, laryngotracheitis, subglottic laryngitis, and obstructive laryngitis, is actually an infectious respiratory disease, mostly caused by either a virus or a bacterium. It primarily targets the windpipe and the voice box. This disease involves the interior of the trachea getting swollen, obstructing the passageway and making breathing difficult while also causing a barking or whooping cough, stridor, and a hoarse voice. The infection lasts around a week but may take longer if it is not treated. It is most inconvenient for people who suffer from it, with newer symptoms developing or the preexisting symptoms getting worse.

Dr. Kenneth Rebong has published an overview article on this disease. The complete article will be published on the Blog of Dr. Rebong at https://drkennethrebong.wordpress.com/

Laryngotracheitis is preventable to an extent with the help of immunization against common viruses such as influenza and diphtheria. Treatment usually includes an orally administered single dose of steroids. However, in conditions that are more serious, nasal epinephrine can also be prescribed. Although the infection lasts a week, complications may lead to hospitalization as well.

The most common victims of croup are children and young teens. Children aged between 6 months and 5 years of age all suffer from this infection at some point in their life during these years. It is slightly more common in boys than it is in girls. The peak time for croup is considered to be autumn.

Symptoms

Some of the most common signs and symptoms of croup are:
* A barking sound is produced when coughing accompanied by stridor.
* Runny nose
* Fever
* Coryza – the appearance of other cold-like symptoms
* Coarse, hoarse voice
* Difficulty in breathing, especially at night

The onset of the signs and symptoms mostly takes place after a few days of the child being infected and often worsens at night.

Causes

This respiratory infection is of two types, viral croup, and bacterial croup. As the names suggest, the infection is caused either by a bacterium or by viruses. Some of the most common viruses that trigger this respiratory condition are parainfluenza and influenza virus.

Diagnosis

A physical examination is usually enough to diagnose this condition. Using the signs and symptoms presented by the patient, doctors can make their diagnosis after ruling out other potential causes, such as the inflammation of the epiglottis. It can also be identified by diagnostic investigations. For instance, blood tests, X-rays, and blood cultures are also used on rare occasions when signs and symptoms are not displayed.

Treatment

Croup can be treated. The one caused by bacteria is often treated using antibiotics, whereas the viral version is treated using cool vapor humidifiers and hot showers. Placing the child in a steamed bathroom for ten to fifteen minutes also helps clear the airways. Other helpful measures include wrapping up the child in warm clothing and avoiding cold environments, making the child breathe in fresh air at night, administering oral steroids, and providing breathing treatments. All these steps have been reported to help with the tracheal swelling and breathing difficulties. Although the infection starts getting better within 48 hours, these measures help speed up the process. For the initial few hours, the child must stay calm, sit up, consume a lot of fluids and avoid cold and chilly environments.

If you believe your child is suffering from this respiratory condition, consulting a physician should be the first thing you do. From there, your physician can advise you on the best course of action to get your child back to full health.

Kenneth Pomar Rebong, MD

Dr. Kenneth P. Rebong, a medical doctor in San Jose, California, specializes in Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. The scope of his practice is from age 0 to 21. He graduated from FEUNRMF University in Manila, Philippines and completed his residency at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA.

References

Blog: https://drkennethrebong.wordpress.com/
News: https://hype.news/dr-kenneth-pomar-rebong/
https://medicogazette.com/dr-kenneth-pomar-rebong
https://hippocratesguild.com/dr-kenneth-pomar-rebong
https://www.linkedin.com/in/kenneth-pomar-rebong-md-4484a938/

Kenneth Pomar Rebong, MD
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Croup: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment | St. Louis Children's Hospital

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